Places to Visit When Travelling to Scotland

Posted on Aug 30 2013 - 4:12am by Renei Nelli

Scotland is a country in the north west of Europe and is part of the constituent nations of the United Kingdom. It consists of nearly 790 islands with bordering neighbours, such as England, the North Sea, and Atlantic Ocean. Its capital and second largest city, Edinburgh, is among Europe’s biggest financial centres. This country attracts many tourists because of its dramatic views of the forest, mountains and valleys, and the coastline. Many boutique accommodations in Scotland are also available, providing the most comfortable lodging areas for every traveller.
Here are some attractions you shouldn’t miss:

Edinburgh Castle

Built in the 11th century, this is the most visited and paid tourist attraction in Scotland with over 1.3 million visitors annually. It’s located high above the hills of the volcanic Castle Rock and stands strong despite the many years that passed. It consists of a palace, fortress, war memorial, and military barracks that are open to the public.

St. Andrews Preservation Trust Museum

This small, independent museum holds information about the history of St. Andrew, the apostle. It features fine art, costumes, collections, and furniture from the early times. Around 10,000 photographs, postcards, slides, and glass negatives are available for viewing upon request. The museum also includes the history of the harbour and local fishing community, the Victorians, and the development of St. Andrews as a city.

King’s Theatre

This historical attraction in Glasgow, the largest city in Scotland, is among the country’s most significant theatres. Frank Matcham, an architect, designed the theatre and opened it in 1904. Many Scottish artists, such as Stanley Baxter, Jimmy Logan, and Rikki Fulton, have performed here. At present, it still features high-end musicals, pantomimes, dances, and dramatic plays.

National Flag Heritage Centre

This centre is the birthplace of Scotland’s flag: the St. Andrew’s cross or Saltire. It originated during a battle in the East Lothian Village of Athelstaneford. King Angus along with his army of Picts vowed that if they won with the saint’s help, they would declare St. Andrew as the patron saint of the country. Fortunately, they won despite fighting a larger army of Saxons.

Visit Scotland and discover many tourist attractions that will delight your adventurous soul. Don’t forget to book your accommodation in boutique hotels like www.tartanmarmalade.com for a more relaxing vacation.